Tutorial_MeltingClock

Melting Clock – Model Creation Sequence

When I started the melting clock project I was unsure about the best way to approach the model as it required hard modelling shapes that melt into organic shapes. In the image sequence I show the method that I came up with. I hope you like it and learn a bit from it.

MELTING CLOCK – Part 1
I started with some traditional box modelling in 3DSMax (1-4).

I didn’t know where the melting would occur and I needed the flexibility to handle client changes without having to remake the whole model. So, I subdivided the surface evenly with quads. This would guarantee that I had a nice sculpting surface in ZBrush. Also, I created tight edge loops around very corner in order for the shape to stay crisp with the additional subdivisions (5).

Then I added the Turbosmooth modifier to some parts to guarantee an even quad distribution across the whole model (6).

MELTING CLOCK – Part 2
I created the UVs for each part using the Unwrap UVW modifier.The advantage of creating the UVs at this stage is that I could get nice UV layouts that are easily painted without including the distortion of the melting.
MELTING CLOCK – Part 3
I exported the model into ZBrush (using GoZ).
I added subdvisions to each part and then started distorting the model progressively.
I used mainly the Move, Smooth and Clay brushes to create the melting effect.
MELTING CLOCK – Part 4
I used the Decimation Master plugin in ZBrush to bring the overall polygon count down to 1.7 Million and exported the model back to Max (1).As I have kept the UVs you can see in the image how they have distorted nicely with the melting (2).
Then I added the textures and materials to achieve the final look (3).